LATEST RELEASE

Disrupting Whiteness by Drick Boyd

In recent years many white people have become awakened to the reality of racism at all levels of American society and the need for significant social change. Yet, the majority of white people in the U.S. still consider racism a topic to avoid rather than engage. Drawing on the author’s personal experience as a professor and antiracism trainer, Disrupting Whiteness offers an approach to talking about racism that is conversational rather than combative and invites people to a deeper exploration of why they think and feel as they do.

Release date January 29, 2021

Disrupting Whiteness is an important book for people like me—people born into a culture of white supremacy who want to help ourselves and our country manage a ‘genetic’ disease called racism. For those who embrace that moral challenge, Drick Boyd is a trustworthy guide.”

Parker J. Palmer
Author of Healing the Heart of Democracy, The Courage to Teach, and On the Brink of Everything.

EXCERPT

Starting with Ourselves

If we who are white want to resist, undo and overcome the impact of racism in American society, we must start with ourselves. For that reason whites must begin by probing and understanding their own experiences with regard to race. For many years I have taught college classes and led workshops on racism. In those settings I often begin by asking people to reflect on what I call their “race story.” I begin by asking them to reflect on a few basic questions. The point of these questions is to encourage people to think about their socialization around issues of race and then to ask themselves how those experiences shaped and influenced them.

What Is Your
Race Story?

“Drick Boyd’s new book, Disrupting Whiteness: Talking to White People About Racism finally provides a practical guide to precisely what black activists have been urging progressive whites to do! Dr. Boyd, the social justice activist, provides the consciousness raising manual and organizing handbook for white progressives to struggle with white folks to confront and “heal” their racism. Thank you, my brother!”

Dr. Sharon Gramby-Sobukwe
Professor of Political Science, Eastern University

“Boyd joins a current overdue collection of white writers and activists who not only highlight the ways racism hurts and limits the lives of BIPOC people, but who look squarely at the ways racism and white supremacy cripples and dehumanizes white people.”

Calenthia S. Dowdy, Ph.D
Anti-racism facilitator/consultant with Roots of Justice, Inc.